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Endoscopy Center Procedures

There are a host of procedures offered at Gastroenterology Specialists, Inc.

COLONOSCOPY

A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows your physician to examine the lining of your large intestine or colon with the use of a colonoscope. The colonoscope, a flexible tube, is inserted into the anus and advanced through the entire large colon (to the cecum).

Using the colonoscope your physician can evaluate for colon polyps, ulcers, inflammation, infection, or bleeding. The procedure is used to look for signs of colorectal cancer and can help diagnose unexplained changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, and weight loss.

During the procedure tissue samples can be collected (biopsy), and abnormal growths (polyps) can be removed.

PREP

You will be given specific instructions informing you how to prepare for your procedure. It is important for you to read all instructions prior to starting the prep. These instructions are designed to allow your physician to provide you the best exam possible and to maximize your safety and to minimize complications.

The colon must be cleaned completely for the procedure to be complete and accurate. The goal of a colon preparation is to eliminate all fecal matter (stool) from the colon so that the lining of the colon can be visualized.

Prior to your scheduled examination you will start the preparation as ordered by your physician. You will be asked to start a clear liquid diet and begin a cleansing preparation. The cleansing preparation will consist of drinking a large volume of a special cleansing solution and laxatives. Written instructions regarding your diet and preparation, including any prescription(s) required, will be provided to you. These instructions should be followed exactly as prescribed by your physician or the procedure may be unsatisfactory and may have to be repeated.

Most medication should be continued as usual, but some may interfere with the examination. Please inform your physician of all current medications or over-the-counter medications, including vitamins and herbals, you may be taking. Aspirin products, blood thinners, arthritis medications, iron preparations, and insulin are examples of medications that may require special instructions.

You will be asked to have nothing to eat or drink, including water, at least three (3) hours before your examination.

FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THESE INSTRUCTIONS MAY CAUSE CANCELLATION OF YOUR PROCEDURE

You will also be instructed to have a responsible adult available to drive you home. You will be unable to drive for eight (8) hours after the examination. The medications used for sedation cause changes in reflexes and judgment similar to the effects of alcohol. Although you may feel awake and competent, please plan to take the day off from work.

Please bring your eye glasses with you, as you will need to sign admission and procedure consent forms.

PRE-PROCEDURE

Upon arrival to the Endoscopy Center the nursing staff will review your medical history and obtain important information regarding your preparation for the examination. This information will also be reviewed by your physician and anesthesia provider.

You will be asked to sign consents for the procedure and for anesthesia. Please inform the staff or your physician if you have any questions or concerns.

You will be asked to change into a gown and placed on a stretcher bed. For your comfort, you may want to bring warm socks. Your personal items will be stored underneath the bed. A registered nurse will then start an intravenous line (IV) in your arm or hand. The IV is a thin catheter that the anesthesia provider will use to administer medications to you.

PROCEDURE

Shortly after entering our pre-procedure area, you will be taken into a procedure room. The staff will place blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen monitors on you. Your vital signs will be monitored frequently throughout the procedure. All patients will be given oxygen. You may be asked to remove any dentures, partials, or oral piercings.

You will lay on your left side for the examination. You will be given medications to help relax and sedate you. Your physician will pass the conoloscope into the anus and slowly guide it through the rectum into the colon. The physician, with the use of the scope, inflates the colon with air to provide better visualization of the lining. Once the scope has reached the opening to the small intestine, it is slowly withdrawn and the lining of the intestine is carefully examined again.

Your physician can remove growths, called polyps, during the procedure and can biopsy abnormal-looking tissues. The physician removes polyps and takes biopsy tissue using tiny instruments passed through the scope. Tissue removal is painless. These tissues will be sent to the pathology department for further evaluation.

Although all patients are different, the procedure typically takes 20-30 minutes to complete.

RECOVERY

You will be monitored in the recovery area after your procedure is complete. Your family or significant other will be escorted back to be with you. Your physician will meet with you and your significant other prior to discharge to discuss his immediate findings of the examination. If tissue samples were obtained, they have to be processed by the pathology department and reviewed by a pathologist. These results will take approximately one to two weeks. You will be notified of these results by mail or phone or the physician may request a follow up visit.

The most common discomfort after the examination is cramping or bloating from the air used to inflate the colon. Patients may also feel groggy from the sedation medications.

Your discharge instructions will be reviewed with you and your significant other. You will be able to eat after the examination unless otherwise instructed by your physician. Due to the lingering effects of the sedation you received, you will be asked to have your first meal at home for your safety. You will not be able to drive or operate heavy machinery. You will also be unable to make important decisions.

COMPLICATIONS

Complications are rare, but can occur. Signs and symptoms to watch for will be reviewed with you and your significant other prior to discharge. You will be asked to immediately call the office number, if you experience them, for further evaluation and instructions.

To view a Colonoscopy click the link below.

ENDOSCOPY

An upper endoscopy, or Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a procedure that allows your physician to examine the interior lining of your esophagus, stomach, and the first part of your small intestine (duodenum) with the use of a thin, flexible instrument called an endoscope.

Using an endoscope your physician can evaluate for ulcers, inflammation, infection, or bleeding. A biopsy (small tissue samples) may be obtained for further examination by a pathologist with the use of a microscope.

PREP

You will be given specific instructions for preparing for your procedure. It is important that you read all instructions. Your physician has provided you with these instructions so that you may have the best possible exam. These instructions are designed to maximize your safety and minimize possible complications. Please do not hesitate to call the office with any questions you may have.

You may not have anything to eat or drink, including water, for approximately six to eight hours before your exam.

An empty stomach allows for the best and safest examination. Your instructions will tell you when to start fasting.

FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THESE INSTRUCTIONS MAY CAUSE CANCELLATION OF YOUR PROCEDURE.

You will also be instructed to have a responsible adult available to drive you home. You will be unable to drive for eight (8) hours after the examination. The medication used for the sedation causes changes in reflexes and judgment similar to the effects of alcohol. Although you may feel awake and competent, please plan to take the day off from work as you will not be able to make important decisions.

Please bring your eye glasses with you as you will need to sign admission and procedure consent forms.

PRE_PROCEDURE

Upon arrival to the Endoscopy Center the nursing staff will review your medical history and obtain important information in regards to your preparation for the examination. This information will also be reviewed by your physician and anesthesia provider.

You will be asked to sign consents for your procedure and for anesthesia. Please inform the staff or your physician if you have any questions or concerns.

You will be asked to change into a gown and placed on a stretcher bed. For your comfort, you may want to bring warm socks. Your personal items will be stored underneath the bed. A registered nurse will then start an intravenous line (IV) in your arm or hand. The IV is a thin catheter that the anesthesia provider will use to administer medications to you.

PROCEDURE

Shortly after entering our pre-procedure area, you will be taken to a procedure room. The staff will place blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen monitors on you so that your vital signs can be monitored frequently throughout your procedure. All patients will be given oxygen. You will be asked to remove any dentures, partials or oral piercings.

You will lie on your left side for the examination and be given medication to help relax and sedate you. Your physician will then pass the endoscope through your mouth and into the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Although all patients are different, the procedure typically takes 10-15 minutes to complete. The endoscope does not interfere with your breathing.

RECOVERY

You will be monitored in the recovery area after your procedure is complete. Your driver will be escorted to the recovery area to be with you. Your physician will meet with you prior to discharge to discuss the immediate findings of the examination. If biopsies where taken, they will be processed by our pathology department and reviewed by a pathologist. These results will take approximately one to two weeks. You will be notified of the results by mail or phone or the physician may request a follow up visit.

The most common discomfort reported after the examination is a feeling of bloating. This is due to the air that was introduced into the stomach during the examination and should resolve quickly. Belching will help to relieve the pressure. In addition, some patients experience a mild sore throat.

Your discharge instructions will be reviewed with you. You will be able to eat after the examination unless otherwise instructed by your physician. Due to the lingering effects of the sedation you received, for your safety you will be asked to have your first meal at home. You will not be able to drive or operate heavy machinery for the rest of the day. You will also be unable to make important decisions.

COMPLICATIONS

Complications to upper endoscopy are rare but can occur. Signs and symptoms to watch for will be reviewed with you prior to discharge. You will be asked to call the office number immediately if you experience any complications. Further evaluation or instructions will be provided to you by a Registered Nurse or your physician.

To view an Endoscopy, view the link below: